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Tuesday, July 7th to Wednesday, September 30th

Please join us in an online, open forum on telehealth. NCB is providing an opportunity for clinicians to ask each other questions, share observations and adapted telehealth protocols for the SoT population via an online forum and technical exchange. This conversation will be a forum for peer-led informational exchange. NCB staff will assist in facilitating and monitoring the conversation.

Directions: Please watch Eugene Augusterfer’s presentation and interview Telemedicine in Mental Health first. Then feel free to join us in this open forum. All are welcome to join this forum, whether you have an account on Healtorture.org or not. For more information on using the forum, please read the directions on the first post. Please keep your comments respectful, relevant, factual, and do not share identifying information about clients per client privacy and HIPAA regulations. This forum will be open from July 6, 2020 through September 30, 2020.

Physiotherapy and rehabilitation of the common complaints and findings in torture victims

Mayanja, F. (1996). African Centre for the Treatment and Rehabilitation of Torture Victims. 26 pages. 
This booklet was reviewed by Stephanie Green, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014. 
The booklet is available free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture. Please email them at library@dignityinstitute.dk to request this booklet. 
Introduction
The African Centre for the Treatment and Rehab of Torture Victims in Uganda is continuing to grow and become recognized by various institutions.

Physiotherapy for survivors of torture

Hough, A. (1992). Physiotherapy, 78(5), 323-328.
This article was reviewed by Mark Deschepper, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
A link to the full text of the article is below.
 
Background:
Through physical contact and the trust built in the physiotherapy relationship, physiotherapy is a vital link of rebuilding the personality of torture survivors.

Physiotherapy examination and treatment

Jacobsen et al.
Link and reference information will be posted soon.
This article was reviewed by Mark Deschepper, physical therapy doctoral student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
 
Introduction:
Most torture survivors complain of pain the locomotor system with many experiencing pain through all daily routines including sleep. Living with pain and performing daily tasks are significantly difficult for survivors. Physical torture leads to damage in the muscles, joints, and neurovascular system, concentration, and memory.

Interaction between patient and physiotherapist in psychiatric care : The physiotherapist's perspective

Gyllensten, A., Gard, G., Hansson, L., & Ekdahl, C. (2000), Advances in Physiotherapy, 2(4), 157-167.
This article was reviewed by Charlotte Hoium, physical therapy doctoral student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
The article may be obtained free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture by emailing them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and including a list of desired articles.
Purpose:  to investigate what factors the physiotherapy experts in psychiatric physiotherapy believed to be important in the interaction between the patient and the physiotherapist.

Survivors of torture and trauma: A special group of patients with chronic pain

Roche, P. (1992). Australian Physiotherapy, 38(2), 156-157.
This article was reviewed by a physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota. More information is to follow. 
A copy of the article may be obtained free of charge from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture by emailing them at library@dignityinstitute.dk and including your mailing address.
This brief letter describes where physical therapists may find more information about the special needs of torture survivors as well as common sequelae from torture and recommendations for physical therapy treatment.
 
Two major

Torture survivors introduction to physiotherapy: Torture and sequelae after torture

Prip, K & Amris, K. (2003), Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims, 45 pages.
 
This booklet was reviewed by Brittany Burton, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
 
Link is to the article from the Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture library. 
 
Introduction: Explanation of what the Rehabilitation and Research Centre for Torture Victims (RCT) is and the objectives of this organization which is based in Denmark.

Muscular imbalance found in examination of posture in torture victims

Skylv,G. (1992). Poster presented at 2nd World Congress on Myofascial Pain and Fibromyalgia, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
 
This article was reviewed by Brittany Burton, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014.
 
A free copy of the article may be requested from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture, by emailing library@dignityinstiture.dk.
 
Background: The aim of torture is not only physical but psychological as well, and globally seems to be focused on the vulnerabilities of the victim.

Torture! Violence! Physiotherapy?

Faure, M. (1995). South African Journal of Physiotherapy, 5(3), 49-51.
This article was reviewed by Charlotte Hoium, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota.
It is available free of charge by request to Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture by emailing library@dignityinstitute.dk
Background: In this brief article, a description of a four day long training seminar about physical therapy and torture was made, as well implications for physical therapy education are made. Special considerations for treating torture survivors are described.
Possible Implications

Declaration for physiotherapists: Guidelines concerning torture and other cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or punishment

World Confederation for Physical Therapy, (1996), Torture Quarterly, 6(4), 103.
This article was reviewed by Charlotte Hoium, doctoral physical therapy student from the University of Minnesota, 2014.
The exact wording of the declaration from the 1995 World Confederation of Physiotherapy  is listed below.
  1. PTs shall not condone or participate in torture or cruel, inhuman or degrading procedures.
  2. The PT shall not provide anything to facilitate the practice of torture or other forms of cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment.
  3. The PT shall not be present during any procedure during which torture or

Physiotherapy for torture victims II: Treatment of chronic pain

Amris, K. & Prip, K. (2000), Torture Quarterly: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture, 10(4), 112-16.
 
This article was reviewed by Stephanie Greer, University of Minnesota doctoral physical therapy student.
 
The link to the article from the Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture, follows below.
 
Background - Several studies of torture victims have shown that physical complaints are common even years after torture and that pain in relation to the musculoskeletal system is a dominating symptom.

Physiotherapy for torture victims I: Chronic pain in torture victims: Possible mechanisms for the pain

Prip, K. & Amris, K. Torture Quarterly: Journal on Rehabilitation of Torture Victims and Prevention of Torture, 10(3), 73-76.
 
This article was reviewed by doctoral physical therapy student, Angela Pitar, from the University of Minnesota, 2014. 
 
A link to the article from the Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture library is below.
 
Background - Throughout the years, several chronic muscular pain syndromes have been described in victims of torture with common findings of:  regional or diffuse pain in the musculoskeletal system often associated with poor sleep, tiredness,

Mind and body-Physiotherapy and complementary therapy

Hough, A. (1992). Paper presented at the International Conference of Centres, Institutions and Individuals Concerned With the Care of Victims of Organized Violence: Health , Political Repression and Human Rights, Santiago, Chile. 
 
This article was reviewed by University of Minnesota physical therapy doctoral student, Angela Pitar, 2014. 
 
The article may be obtained free of charge by emailing library@dignityinstiture.dk
 
Background - Torture victims often present with a multitude of problems and complementary therapy seeks to address each problem using a comprehensive and

Complementary therapies for treating survivors of torture

Vargas, C., O’Rourke, D. & Esfandian, M. Refuge: Canada’s Periodical on Refugees, 22(1), 129-137.
 
This article was reviewed by doctoral physical therapy student from the University of Minnesota, Angela Pitar, 2014.
 
Link to full text article from the Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture is below.
 
Background - the assumptions that physical pain, unexplained by medical or physical findings, is psychosomatic in nature has been long standing and pervasive as was pain reported by survivors of torture attributed to psychological trauma.

Sequelae in Soft Tissues after Beating, Suspension, and Fixation

Prip, K. (1994), Torture Quarterly, Suppl. 1, 28-31.
 
This article was reviewed by University of Minnesota doctoral physical therapy student Angela Pitar, 2014. 
 
The link to the full text from Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture is below.
 
Background: Many movement impairments are found in torture survivors, since they were placed in fixed positions for prolonged periods of time.  This article discusses the effects of tissue stress/strain, the phases of injury, and different management approaches for the different phases. 
 
 
Background -
  • when tendons are loaded, all the

Pain: physiologic mechanisms used in physical therapy

 Skjoerboek, I. (1994). Torture Quarterly, Suppl. 1, 33-35.
 
This article was reviewed by Angela Pitar, doctoral physical therapy student at the University of Minnesota, 2014. 
 
The link to the article from the Dignity-Danish Institute Against Torture, is below.
 
Background - the definition of pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with the actual or potential tissue damage, or described by the patient in terms of such damage. Detailed descriptions of mechanisms of pain and treatment implications are made.
 
Physiology of pain - the perception of pain is

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