Mental Health

Join the Conversation

Tuesday, July 7th to Wednesday, September 30th

Please join us in an online, open forum on telehealth. NCB is providing an opportunity for clinicians to ask each other questions, share observations and adapted telehealth protocols for the SoT population via an online forum and technical exchange. This conversation will be a forum for peer-led informational exchange. NCB staff will assist in facilitating and monitoring the conversation.

Directions: Please watch Eugene Augusterfer’s presentation and interview Telemedicine in Mental Health first. Then feel free to join us in this open forum. All are welcome to join this forum, whether you have an account on Healtorture.org or not. For more information on using the forum, please read the directions on the first post. Please keep your comments respectful, relevant, factual, and do not share identifying information about clients per client privacy and HIPAA regulations. This forum will be open from July 6, 2020 through September 30, 2020.

Couples Therapy with Torture Survivors

Description

Torture and trauma break connections and disrupt attachment bonds with a consequent increase in marital distress. Our clinical experience at CVT confirms the fact that couples’ relationships are dramatically damaged by torture. At the same time, those relationships are instrumental in the survivors’ recovery. Well-designed couples therapy has the potential to help survivor couples deal more effectively with trauma-related marital distress, to assist partners to understand and provide spousal support, to promote treatment engagement, and to strengthen intimate relationships.

The other webinars in the post-family reunification series are:

Manual on Brief Ethnographic Interviewing: Understanding an Issue, Problem or Idea from a Local Perspective

The brief ethnographic interviewing methods described in this manual were originally developed for use by NGO’s providing psychosocial and mental health interventions to address two recurring needs - how to quickly and systematically gather and organize information (needs, problems, beliefs, strengths, etc.) when implementing programs with new populations or communities or develop culturally relevant indicators for evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial and mental health interventions.
 
The technique involves using a brief semi-structured interview, framed around a question, to

PTSD Treatment For Monks

In this radio interview by Fresh Air, "Dr. Michael Grodin discusses his experiences treating Tibetan monks who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder. Many of the monks were imprisoned or tortured because of their resistance to the Chinese presence in Tibet, and now some of them experience "flashbacks" while meditating.

"Grodin hypothesizes that meditation may reduce the brain's ability to inhibit unpleasant thoughts and memories. His treatment combines elements of Western and Tibetan medicine and therapy. Grodin wrote about his findings in the March issue of Mental Health, Religion, and

Emergency & Psychological Preparedness: Supporting Survivors and Ourselves During Crises

This webinar was jointly presented by the National Partnership for Community Training, of Gulf Coast Jewish & Family Community Services, and the National Capacity Building Project, of The Center for Victims of Torture., on May 13, 2013.

Summary

“The first thing to remember is that we all have a common bond with our patients” says Dr. Richard Mollica of Harvard Medical School in this webinar on emergency preparedness.

Screening for War Trauma, Torture, and Mental Health Symptoms Among Newly Arrived Refugees: A National Survey of U.S. Refugee Health Coordinators

The first national survey of refugee mental health screening practices found that while refugee trauma survivors are at increased risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder and major depression, most states do not provide mental health screenings. Of the 25 states that provide mental health screening, 17 use informal conversation rather than standardized measures. Co-author Patricia Shannon, MSW, PhD is a research associate at CVT and assistant professor at the University of Minnesota. The article was published in the Journal of Immigrant and Refugee Studies (paid access only).

Somali and Oromo Refugees: Correlates of Torture and Trauma History

This article, by Jim Jaranson (associated with the Center for Victims of Torture) and others, studies Somali and Ethiopian (Oromo) refugees in Minnesota to determine torture prevalence and associated problems. This study highlights the need to recognize torture in African refugees, especially women, identify indicators of posttraumatic stress in torture survivors, and provide additional resources to care for tortured refugees.

Strengthening Case Management: The Value of the Therapeutic Dimension

While most torture treatment centers maintain a strict division between mental health and case management services, mental health concepts can be appropriately adjusted for use in a case management setting. This webinar expands on an often limited view of the role of case managers in the treatment of torture survivors. While it does not advocate that case managers become therapists, it suggests they adapt psychoanalytic theory to their jobs in order to promote “empathetic connections” and “safe spaces” in their relationships with clients.

Torture Survivors and their Power: Strengths-based Treatment

Individuals who have been tortured have lost their power during their experiences. The right to stop pain, make choices, and direct one's life are taken away during torture. Using strengths-based approaches, providers can prevent taking their power away again. We can recognize that they are the expert in what they need; they have all that is necessary to survive; and that the power to grow is innate within them. In this webinar we'll discuss some of the theory and methods behind strengths-based care.

After participating in the Webinar participants will be able to: 1) Describe the theory and methods used in strengths-based care. 2) Recognize how strengths-based approaches can inform their own interactions with their clients

Initiatives in Collaboration: Bringing Trauma Care to the Community

The Center for Victims of Torture has a community project entitled “Healing in Partnership”, a primary objective of which is to educate community based organizations (CBOs) about mental health and to bring basic mental health education to trauma affected populations within these settings. This is different from the traditional clinic based approach to providing mental health services. It removes barriers to access to care. It tries to reduce one of the major barriers to seeking assistance: stigma related to mental health.

Istanbul Protocol: Manual on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment

United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, 1999

When considering psychological consequences of torture, see, particularly, section VI, Psychological Evidence of Torture, pages 43-56.

When writing affidavits, see, particularly, Annex IV, Guidelines for medical evaluation of torture and ill-treatment, pages 70-72.

Available in a variety of languages.

Assessing Trauma & Associated Symptoms in Refugees & Torture Survivors

In this webinar, Dr. Michael Hollifield, M.D. focuses on clinical care for refugees and torture survivors, and ways to measure trauma symptoms. He reviews numerous measurement instruments, identifying whether each measurement tool has been tested for reliability and validity for certain populations. He reviews how to choose a tool that fits your own needs. He provides many useful attachments, including a set of the “comprehensive trauma inventory” (CTI) forms.

Chapter 6: Psychological Services

This chapter focuses on identifying basic principles and areas of learning needed to begin providing mental health care to torture survivors living in the United States. The chapter is written for mental health providers who are relatively new to working with torture survivors. Providers may be called upon to offer any of a variety of psychological services to individuals, families, groups, or communities affected by torture, including crisis intervention, counseling, assessment, consultation, facilitation, supervision, and short- and long-term therapy.

This chapter is not intended as a “how

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Mental Health