Acupuncture for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial

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This article, by Hollifield, Michael; Sinclair-Lian, Nityamo; Warner, Teddy D.; Hammerschlag, Richard, was published in The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease. Volume 195, Number 6 (June 2007). (Link is to full article.)

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential efficacy and acceptability of acupuncture for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). People diagnosed with PTSD were randomized to either an empirically developed acupuncture treatment (ACU), a group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or a wait-list control (WLC). The primary outcome measure was self-reported PTSD symptoms at baseline, end treatment, and 3-month follow-up. Repeated measures MANOVA was used to detect predicted Group X Time effects in both intent-to-treat (ITT) and treatment completion models. Compared with the WLC condition in the ITT model, acupuncture provided large treatment effects for PTSD (F 1, 46 12.60; p 0.01; Cohen’s d 1.29), similar in magnitude to group CBT (F 1, 47 12.45; p 0.01; d 1.42) (ACU vs. CBT, d 0.29). Symptom reductions at end treatment were maintained at 3-month follow-up for both interventions. Acupuncture may be an efficacious and acceptable nonexposure treatment option for PTSD. Larger trials with additional controls and methods are warranted to replicate and extend these findings.

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