Webinars (all topics)

Strengthening Case Management: Introducing Narrative Concepts

Wednesday, 19 December 2012

The second in a proposed 3-part series by Joan Hodges on strengthening case management, this webinar presents narrative therapy as a potential approach for case managers (CMs) to apply when working with torture survivors.  Using narrative concepts, case managers can use therapeutic questioning to help clients recognize and reflect on their current problems and to empower clients to reexamine and reframe their lives. Please note this webinar does not qualify anyone to do narrative therapy

Objectives

  • To gain a basic understanding narrative therapy
  • To discuss the potential for narrative theory

Performance Measurement – Using Data to Improve Quality

Wednesday, 17 October 2012

In this webinar Dr. Edward Cohen speaks directly to torture treatment providers, to identify ways you can evaluate your Center’s performance. Dr. Cohen explains the basic terminology of performance measurement. His examples cover different areas of service, and may help you identify which aspects of your own program you could measure, and the need to focus your collection of data to the item being measured. He discusses how evaluation not only helps you report the success of your program, it allows you to proactively evaluate the quality of your delivery of services.

Strengthening Case Management: The Value of the Therapeutic Dimension

Wednesday, 15 August 2012

While most torture treatment centers maintain a strict division between mental health and case management services, mental health concepts can be appropriately adjusted for use in a case management setting. This webinar expands on an often limited view of the role of case managers in the treatment of torture survivors. While it does not advocate that case managers become therapists, it suggests they adapt psychoanalytic theory to their jobs in order to promote “empathetic connections” and “safe spaces” in their relationships with clients.

Torture Survivors and their Power: Strengths-based Treatment

Wednesday, 18 July 2012

Individuals who have been tortured have lost their power during their experiences. The right to stop pain, make choices, and direct one's life are taken away during torture. Using strengths-based approaches, providers can prevent taking their power away again. We can recognize that they are the expert in what they need; they have all that is necessary to survive; and that the power to grow is innate within them. In this webinar we'll discuss some of the theory and methods behind strengths-based care.

After participating in the Webinar participants will be able to: 1) Describe the theory and methods used in strengths-based care. 2) Recognize how strengths-based approaches can inform their own interactions with their clients

Initiatives in Collaboration: Bringing Trauma Care to the Community

Wednesday, 20 June 2012

The Center for Victims of Torture has a community project entitled “Healing in Partnership”, a primary objective of which is to educate community based organizations (CBOs) about mental health and to bring basic mental health education to trauma affected populations within these settings. This is different from the traditional clinic based approach to providing mental health services. It removes barriers to access to care. It tries to reduce one of the major barriers to seeking assistance: stigma related to mental health.

Assessing Trauma & Associated Symptoms in Refugees & Torture Survivors

Wednesday, 29 June 2011

In this webinar, Dr. Michael Hollifield, M.D. focuses on clinical care for refugees and torture survivors, and ways to measure trauma symptoms. He reviews numerous measurement instruments, identifying whether each measurement tool has been tested for reliability and validity for certain populations. He reviews how to choose a tool that fits your own needs. He provides many useful attachments, including a set of the “comprehensive trauma inventory” (CTI) forms.

Trends in Asylum Law Affecting Torture Survivors

Wednesday, 16 May 2012

Description:

This Webinar provides an opportunity for staff of torture treatment programs to catch up on trends in asylum law and hear more about recent case law that may affect their clients.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will gain knowledge of recent case law regarding asylum issues relevant to torture survivors.
  2. Participants will gain knowledge of recent case law regarding mental impairment as it might affect asylum claims and psychological evaluations of their clients.
  3. Participants will have an opportunity for Q&A regarding trends and changes in immigration proceedings

Presenter:        

Determining Client & Group Outcomes

Wednesday, 15 September 2010

Joan Othieno reviews the basics theories of identifying outcomes for a client or a group. She distinguishes outputs (activities and products) and outcomes (changes in lives of clients). She provides examples of short-term outcomes, such as changes in a client’s knowledge of the effects of trauma, or understanding the value of social interaction. Centers planning short-term projects may benefit by reviewing this webinar.

Communicating/Reporting Program Outcomes

Thursday, 31 March 2011

Joan Othieno reviews different types of media to convey successful program results, noting the importance of identifying your audience, and “telling your story” in a way that resonates with your audience.   She compares the appropriateness of different types of tables and graphs, and provides a comprehensive list of the components you can include in an evaluation report. She notes the need for empirical evidence to support conclusions.

Presentation by Joan Othieno, PhD, from NCB Institute on Practicing Outcome Evaluation for Torture Survivor Programs.

Outcome Evaluation for Torture Treatment Centers: Concepts and Strategies

Wednesday, 30 March 2011

This webinar by Ken Miller is part of a full day seminar, with two detailed case studies and group exercises, leading torture treatment providers through the process of developing a culturally sensitive measurement tool. In both case studies, he shows the steps used to develop and evaluate a measure. These case studies illustrate sensitivity to cultural factors when measuring indicators of well-being and healing.

In the first example, Dr. Miller provides the detailed methodology used to assess mental health in post-war Afghanistan, showing the development and implementation the Afghan Symptom Checklist (ASCL). The second example recounts the development of the “Children’s Daily Stressor Scale (CDSS)” in Sri Lanka. Both examples show how you can use informal narratives to identify indicators and then use those to develop a questionnaire. Useful detail includes how to graphically communicate choices on a Likert scale, and processes to analyze your data.

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